Stay Cool This Summer at Citi Center

Posted 1 August 2012 12:00 AM by Citi

It’s August and summer is nearing the official midpoint. It’s hard to believe that days are getting shorter, back-to-school commercials have invaded our televisions, and bathing suits are 50% off. At the Citi Performing Arts Center, we’ve been well-aware of the rising temperatures, since our Heating Ventilation Air Conditioning (HVAC) system has been undergoing serious repairs. Think HVAC is boring? Well, the next time you are in the theatres you’ll be glad we brought it up!

Since the Fourth of July, the Air Conditioning has been off in the Wang Theatre. While the fireworks (and lightning!) flashed over the Charles, the Wang Theatre was experiencing some serious climate change. Crews have been busy replacing the old chillers will new energy efficient versions that will ensure that patrons in the seats and artists onstage are comfortable in our theatres. The last time the system was replaced was 25 years ago, but some of the pipe that is being replaced is over 50 years old—some is even original, dating back to when the theatre was built in 1925!

Once the project is completed in September, it will take nearly a week to cool the theatre down to a comfortable 70 degrees—just in time for Celtic Thunder. But fear not, all you Boz Scaggs, Michael McDonald, and Donald Fagan fans, we promise you won’t be melting at the Dukes of September concert next week—we'll be temporarily turning on the chillers just for you!

This project would not have been possible if not for the generous support of the Massachusetts Cultural Council/Cultural Facilities Fund and the Yawkey Foundation.

In the spirit of building preservation, the Shubert also received a dose of TLC from artist Iris Lee Marcus. Iris and her team repainted the marquee and really brought it to life, giving it a look consistent with the building’s historic style.

Crews working on the HVAC project atop the Citi Wang Theatre roof.

http://www.irisleemarcus.com/


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